LA Clippers Message Board

Welcome To ClipperTalk.com

Clipper Talk is the largest Los Angeles Clippers forum online. Join today and get in on the conversation.




Topic / Topic starter Replies Last post
Inefficient articles. (Chris Paul; 2001-2002 Wizards; Allen Iverson)
nuraman00 » 05/31/18 » 2:51pm
3 nuraman00
06/5/18 » 4:08pm
Boban
ClipperSisyphus » 05/27/18 » 9:02am
44 mannycoon
06/5/18 » 1:46pm
Test
Mistwell » 06/5/18 » 10:49am
9 nuraman00
06/5/18 » 1:07pm
LOL Kendall dumped Blake
babyradar01 » 05/30/18 » 10:13am
5 V-Ice
06/5/18 » 8:57am
Happy Sterling Is Gone 4 Year Anniversary!
Mistwell » 06/3/18 » 9:14am
2 pro100
06/3/18 » 9:28am

Fully Clips
[Fansided: Fully Clips] - Michael Porter Jr. Player Profile
... school scene, captivating the basketball world, this gamble could grant the Clippers either a huge benefit or a serious travesty of a trade. The hypothetical wit ...
LA Sports Hub Clippers
Los Angeles Clippers 2018 NBA Draft profile: Shai Gilgeous-Alexander

With the 12th and 13th overall selections in the 2018 NBA Draft, the Los Angeles Clippers could select Shai Gilgeous-Alexander from Kentucky. The Los Angeles Clippers are in need of some young talent and an identity moving forward. As we get closer to the 2018 NBA Draft, that identity will become clearer. Once the draft […]

Los Angeles Clippers 2018 NBA Draft profile: Shai Gilgeous-Alexander - LA Sports Hub - LA Sports Hub - A Los Angeles Sports Site - Lakers, Clippers, Rams, Chargers, Kings, Dodgers, Angels, USC Trojans, UCLA Bruins, Ducks, Galaxy

LATimes Clipper News
Half of the NBA Finals are set, with LeBron James carrying Cleveland to another Eastern Conference crown

LeBron James is prone to saying that “Game Seven” are the two best words in sports, an occasion when the lines dividing success from failure are at their thinnest.

It’s when the weight and pressure help create unforgettable moments, when the stakes help define legacies. It’s when stars, like James,...

LATimes Clipper News
Half of the NBA Finals are set, with LeBron James leading Cleveland to another Eastern Conference crown

LeBron James is prone to saying that “Game Seven” are the two best words in sports, a time when the lines dividing success from failure are at their thinnest.

It’s when the weight and pressure help create unforgettable moments, when the stakes help define legacies. It’s when stars, like James,...

LA Sports Hub Clippers
Los Angeles Clippers 2018 NBA Draft profile: Collin Sexton

Collin Sexton is a dynamic playmaking guard that carried Alabama to an NCAA Tournament berth that could carry the Los Angeles Clippers into a new era. With both the 12th and 13th overall picks in the 2018 NBA Draft, the Los Angeles Clippers can draft a difference maker. Collin Sexton of Alabama can be that […]

Los Angeles Clippers 2018 NBA Draft profile: Collin Sexton - LA Sports Hub - LA Sports Hub - A Los Angeles Sports Site - Lakers, Clippers, Rams, Chargers, Kings, Dodgers, Angels, USC Trojans, UCLA Bruins, Ducks, Galaxy

Clips Nation
The Clippers Worked Out Omari Spellman and Terry Larrier Yesterday

The Clippers are apparently taking looks at potential 2nd round picks and undrafted free agents

Per Adam Zagoria of the New York Times and Sports Net New York, the Clippers worked out UConn’s Terry Larrier and Villanova’s Omari Spellman on Thursday.

Larrier was only a junior at UConn and still had eligibility remaining, but graduated from school in May, so decided to leave and pursue a pro career. A 6’8 guard, Larrier averaged 13.9 points, 4.8 rebounds, and 0.9 assists in 34.1 minutes per game, shooting 39.8% from the floor and 37.8% from three (on 4.7 attempts) in his last year of college. He’s not listed on ESPN’s top 100 prospects, nor have I read much about him, so I’d guess he’s more of a Summer League roster spot type of guy.

Omari Spellman is a different matter, a freshman at Villanova who is still testing the waters on whether to stick in the draft or not. A 6’9 stretch forward, Spellman averaged 10.9 points, 8.0 rebounds, 0.8 assists, and 1.5 blocks in just 28 minutes per game for Villanova, the NCAA 2018 champion and the best collegiate team in the country. Spellman shot 47.6% from the floor and 43.3% from deep (on 3.8 attempts), demonstrating an ability to efficiently score even as a freshman. Spellman is 49th on ESPN’s top 100 prospects, and would probably go in the 2nd round if he stays in the draft. While Spellman can shoot and has defensive potential, he’s a bit raw, and probably wouldn’t be ready for NBA action right away.

These workouts, along with that scheduled for LiAngelo Ball, suggest that the Clippers are putting in the work on “under the radar” types, though Spellman could also be an indicator that they are looking to buy a 2nd round pick, as they did twice last year for Jawun Evans and Sindarius Thornwell. Not much information has come out on Clippers’ workouts so far, but we will keep you updated when further news becomes available.

Villanova's Omari Spellman and UConn's Terry Larrier worked out today for the Clippers. Both also worked out for the Lakers.@PSACardinals https://t.co/Vb64rJtYGe

— Adam Zagoria (@AdamZagoria) May 24, 2018
LATimes Clipper News
Chris Paul's body has failed him before in playoffs; Rockets will try to eliminate Warriors without him

If you have followed Chris Paul’s NBA career, you had seen this look before — a blank face hiding a boiling anger inside, frustration on the cusp of eruption.

Paul’s body, as it has before in the postseason, failed him Thursday night. Before the Rockets announced his fate, Paul knew. It was written...

LATimes Clipper News
Chris Paul's body has failed him before in playoffs; Rockets will try to eliminate Warriors without him

If you have followed Chris Paul’s NBA career, you had seen this look before — a blank face hiding a boiling anger inside, frustration on the cusp of eruption.

Paul’s body, as it has before in the postseason, failed him Thursday night. Before the Rockets announced his fate, Paul knew. It was written...

Clips Nation
Correlating College Point Guard Statistics to NBA Success

Which college stats are most important for point guards’ NBA success?

This article is the conclusion to my three-part series on college stats and their translation to NBA success. The wing and big men articles contain all my methodology, so if you need a refresher (or this is your first time reading one of these), please check one of those out.

Compared to big men or wings, there are fewer sub-groups within the general class of “point guards”. Sure, there are some point guards who are pass-first, others who look to shoot as their primary option, and even a few who are defensively focused or play mostly off-ball. But generally, point guards handle the ball a fair amount, and are some of the smallest players on the court. That means it’s easier to categorize them together—they operate differently, and each player has a slightly unique playstyle, but the differences are not as vast as those between certain types of big men or wings.

With that said, here are the simplified results of the regression analysis. ‘Significant’ means that the statistic explained some of the variability in the NBA advanced statistics to at least some extent. ‘Model-usable’ indicates that while not useful by itself, the inclusion of that stat strengthened the overall model of correlation. ‘Insignificant’ suggests that the college stat had no real bearing on the players’ advanced metrics in the NBA.

Three stats jump off the page as having more importance to point guard success than anything else: assists, steals, and true shooting%. The first two make a good deal of sense, as assists are the most ‘traditional’ point guard statistic, and point guards have long racked up steals as well. True shooting is a bit more complicated, but I’ll return to that later. After that, there’s another group of three stats that are significant in one model, usable in another, and insignificant in the third—age, points, and three-pointers made. These all get lumped together on a similar tier of importance, leaving rebounds, blocks, and turnovers as the more irrelevant numbers. The coefficients, however, are where things get interesting.

Tier 1: True Shooting, Steals, Assists

Tier 2: 3PT, Points, Age

Tier 3: Rebounds, Blocks, Turnovers

The most eye-opening information regarding the coefficients in the models is that assists and points are negative across the board, meaning that prospects with lower numbers in those categories have generally had greater NBA success. Assists, in particular, is fascinating, as it is usually the first statistic that is brought up in any discussion of point guards and their relative value compared to one another. Why would point guards with higher assist numbers in college have worse odds of success?

There are a couple reasons why this could be the case. The first is that it is likely that point guards on successful teams with better teammates would have more assists. This wouldn’t necessarily be an indication of their passing prowess or playing ability, just that they are surrounded by teammates who can convert on the opportunities given them. Even if a point guard can only run the most basic of reads, if he’s surrounded by several knock-down three-point shooters and a big man who can catch lobs, he’s probably going to rack up assists. Similarly, point guards with high assist numbers might be ball-dominating, controlling point guards with high usage rates. Regardless of efficiency in passing, or running a good offense, a point guard who has the ball a lot will simply have more assists than one who doesn’t. The next question is, why are these bad things? After all, NBA teammates are far superior to those in college, so point guards who play on stacked collegiate teams would seem to be more ahead of their competition. And many of the most storied point guards in NBA history are ball-dominating, high-usage handlers who controlled every aspect of their team’s offense.

I think the first option wouldn’t necessarily be a bad thing for college point guards’ success in the NBA, it would just lead to deceptive assist numbers, making them appear to be better than they are. But the second is reflective of how the NBA has shifted in recent years offensively. While point guards still possess the ball a lot in the NBA, the era of point guards exclusively running the offense and calling out plays from the top of the key has been left behind. Instead, most NBA teams have adopted more free-flowing systems with multiple ball-handlers, so that even if a point guard runs a lot of pick and roll, they will play without the ball quite frequently as well. And that type of offense requires different skills than just passing, ball-handling, and ability to run a pick and roll. More specifically, point guards in the modern NBA need to be able to shoot, and they must also possess the capability to attack the basket and finish at the rim, which in turn opens passing lanes for drive and kicks to three-point shooters.

This shift in offense also explains why points have a negative coefficient as well. Most NBA point guards are able scorers, yes. However, more than sheer scoring, they need to be efficient. Point guards are usually the quickest players on the court and have the best handles. This enables them to create their own shot more easily than other players, meaning they often lead their team in shot attempts. But point guards who can create shots but can’t finish them are therefore a massive drain to their team. What’s the point of being able to take a lot of shots if the efficiency rate is horrible? Point guards who score a lot in college might be the only players on their team who can create their own shot, so by necessity they must score, and shoot frequently. But that also means they must take a lot of bad shots, which has the double negative of inflating point per game numbers and instilling bad habits. Seeing a point guard with a high scoring average in college isn’t a bad thing by any means, but the immediate next step must be checking on how they are scoring, and whether they are doing so efficiently.

That’s why true shooting (and three-point makes) are such an important indicator for modern point guards. Scoring efficiently is only going to get harder in the NBA, and if point guards can’t finish against college rim protectors, or shoot over college wing defenders, they’re sure going to find it even more difficult in the NBA. Therefore, point guards who might not score much in college, but score efficiently, appear to be better prospects. Not only could this suggest that they play off-ball more frequently (already setting them up for NBA offensive systems), it also indicates they have a method of scoring that they are truly good at, and which could then possibly carry over to the NBA better. Point guards who have a high number of three-point makes in college almost certainly take a fair amount off the dribble, and that’s a huge skill to have going into the NBA, where the high pick and roll is king. Even when off-ball, having the ability to space the floor for other playmakers is vital.

Steals, as usual, are a fantastic indicator of basketball awareness and functional athleticism. Some systems are designed to create steals, and a lot of point guards gamble in passing lanes, often weakening their defense. Still, just having the wherewithal to read the game well enough to see possible takeaways and having the quickness to get to the spot is something that boosts steals more than anything else, and those are abilities that translate to the NBA very cleanly.

So, should high-scoring, high-assist point guard prospects be automatically shunned to the second round? Absolutely not. As always, these analyses are designed to see through the flaws in basic stats, and to read into underlying talents and skills that are better able to carry over into the NBA, not as strict guidelines for who is a good prospect or not. But if you see a point guard with good efficiency who can shoot threes, and has high steal numbers? There’s probably a place for them in the NBA, and it might be a pretty good place at that.

Fully Clips
[Fansided: Fully Clips] - Locked on Clippers May 25: Doc Rivers, Mike Woodson Get New Deals
... able to get that level of production out of rookies is very rare. The young Clippers core stepped up big when needed, and Rivers should be credited for a lot of ...